A Robbery at the Denver U.S. Mint That Was Never Solved

Nicole Henley
4 min readNov 13, 2019

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The only confirmed member was eventually found…dead.

Nearly a century ago, the Denver Mint was robbed in Colorado one morning in a case that remains unsolved to this day.

Mint Job

On December 18, 1922, a day like any other as a Federal Reserve Bank truck sat outside the U.S. Mint in Denver, Colorado. At the time, the guards on duty had just loaded up a total of $200,000 when, at 10:30 a.m., a group of thieves pulled up in a Buick beside the truck. While one of them stayed behind the wheel as the getaway, the other three men jumped out. As one robber rushed to the rear of the truck, firing at and fatally striking a guard, Charles Linton, in the process, a second thief smashed open the truck’s window. As the money was lifted out by the second man, the other two sprayed the Mint building with bullets from their sawed-off shotguns.

As the bandits went to work, and the alarms bell clanged away, employees of the Mint building grabbed their rifles and returned fire. Within seconds, bullets peppered West Colfax, several other buildings nearby as well as the side of the Mint building itself. Finally, 90 seconds later, shots stopped flying from both directions. The robbers ultimately got away, driving east on Colfax, with 50 packages of $5 bills in tow.

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Nicole Henley

Writer of true crime, unsolved mysteries, and marvels of history. Lover of movies, books, cats, and anime.